Georgetown, Washington D.C.

R Street between 30th and 31st Street, NW

Washington, D.C. 20007

info@montroseparkdc.org

Friends of Montrose Park is an official partner of the National Park Service, supporting Rock Creek Park through its SOLVE (Sustaining Our Lands with Volunteer Energy) stewardship program.

NOVEMBER 15, 2019

TREE PLANTING

With Casey Trees, the Embassy of Finland, and the European Diplomatic Community.

Casey Trees has awarded Montrose Park fifty trees - and in honor of Finland's Presidency of the Council European Union, the Embassy of Finland is inviting all 28 EU member states to come plant the trees! 

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15TH, 8:30 AM-12 noon

RSVP: info@montroseparkdc.org

OCTOBER 19, 2019

FALL CLEAN UP

Fall clean up and weeding of the azalea and boxwood beds.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19TH, 9 AM-12 noon

RSVP: info@montroseparkdc.org

June 14, 2019

BENEFICIAL MITE APPLICATION

Help revive the historic boxwood plantings with the application of beneficial mites.  The beneficial mites that we will be releasing prey exclusively on the spider mites that are affecting the health of the boxwood.

FRIDAY, JUNE 14TH, 8 AM-10 AM

RSVP: info@montroseparkdc.org

April 27, 2019

CLEAN UP AND PLANTING DAY

Please join us for a Community Volunteer Event

We will be planting azaleas and weeding the azaleas beds.

SATURDAY, April 27, 9:30 am - 12 noon

RSVP: info@montroseparkdc.org

October 20, 2018

BOXWOOD PRUNING

Help revive the historic boxwood plantings at a special workshop led by renowned boxwood expert Lynn Batdorf.

SATURDAY, October 20th, 10 am - 1 pm

(Rain date: Saturday, October 27th, 10 am - 1 pm)

RSVP: info@montroseparkdc.org

ABOUT THE BOXWOOD

The Boxwood Gardens and Boxwood Walk are thought to be originally designed and planted around 1850 by garden designer John Henry Small for the Boyce family, who owned the estate where Montrose Park now stands.  Small arrived in Washington, D.C. from England in 1848 and one of his first commissions was to design a garden for the neighboring Linthicum estate, now Dumbarton Oaks.  After the property was acquired by the Federal Government in 1910, the boxwood gardens were patched with fill-in plantings according to plans developed by landscape architect George Burnap, from the Office of Public Buildings and Grounds.  The Pergola in the center was designed by Burnap and built in 1913.  In 1922 landscape architect Irving Payne, also from the OPBG, appears to have simplified the earlier plan.  Vestiges of the original plan are still evident, including the circular bed in the middle of the two defined gardens to the north and south of the Pergola, and arrangement of the walkways.

The Boxwood Walk was also a feature of the Boyce estate, and once had parallel rows of boxwood at the end of a walk on axis with the door of the original house, which fronted onto R Street.

Using age-determining calculations recent measurements have shown that the boxwood are approximately 150 to 160 years old.

ABOUT LYNN BATDORF

For 36 years, Lynn Batdorf was Curator of the National Boxwood Collection at the U.S. National Arboretum in Washington, D.C.  For the past 30 years he has served as the International Cultivar Registration Authority for Buxus.   He has authored three popular books and over 50 articles on a variety of boxwood topics, and is an Honorary Life Member of the American Boxwood Society and the European Boxwood & Topiary Society.